Protecting the old, for the young

It’s not often enough that we hear about happy endings when it comes to old-growth forest campaigning. That’s why I just have to share my excitement that the Forest Trust for the Children of Cortes Island has been formed to purchase Island Timberland forest land holdings on Cortes Island and protect it in perpetuity for the children of Cortes. Here’s a great video about the project and an article my partner and I wrote to raise awareness about the campaign back in 2012. Keep up to date on Cortes forest campaigning with WildStands on Facebook.

 

Cortes Island: a West Coast Wildland Under Threat

By Marc deMontigny and Kat Zimmer

Published in The Martlet, March 2012

We recently had the great fortune of touring Cortes Island’s breathtaking stands of old growth forest. The island is truly one of the most remarkable wild places on the West Coast. Part of the last 1% of original Coastal Douglas Fir zone in the endangered “Dry Maritime” forests along BC’s southern coast, its majestic stands are in danger of being clear-cut on an industrial scale.

Island Timberlands (IT) recently announced they would begin logging their privately owned parcels, which consist of 2700 acres bisecting the island. According to WildStands, an alliance of concerned residents, these lands hold the deepest soils, the biggest trees, and the island’s central water recharge area. They are also home to 10 species listed as threatened, endangered, or of special concern, including the great blue heron and the northern pygmy owl. The same number of ecological communities are also in jeopardy.

Due to parasitic mistletoe on many of the old trees, they are no longer “ripe for the picking” in IT’s eyes, and will not make for good timber. However, they would likely be cut down regardless for ease of working conditions. This would threaten the habitat of several species of birds and other animals. The tape marking the cut line was well within wetlands in several spots, posing a severe risk to these sensitive ecosystems.

Our guides included three individuals who had been involved in the forestry industry for many years. One told us about a single parcel of land in the Maritimes that has been logged selectively and sustainably by his family for several generations.

The perspective of our guides was highly balanced: they explained that many in the community are not against logging in the area. They just want to ensure the integrity of the ecosystem and the watershed is not threatened when trees are harvested from an area. A balance must be maintained so that trees can continue to be harvested sustainably long into the future. Old growth stands provide habitat for threatened species, support for new generations of trees, and carbon capture.

The plans have been stalled by the community of 1,000 year-round residents, who have been battling industrial scale logging on the island for two decades. In the face of an outpouring of resistance, IT has postponed the logging until at least September. Though the company has agreed to further discussions with the community, there is no guarantee that it will adapt its plans. There is a chance, however, that IT might consider selling the land in the future.

If it does, the community plans to be ready. A Forest Trust has been formed to purchase IT holdings, which would provide the opportunity for youth to practice stewardship of forest lands and watersheds. A grassroots organization comprised of a large portion of island residents is seeking community tenure, ideally in collaboration with the Klahoose First Nation, over the forest reserve lands for the creation of an Ecosystem-Based Community Forest. This would provide long-term stability, rather than an explosion of jobs followed by high unemployment and environmental degradation long after IT is gone.

Their success in slowing the process is due in part to a support network that extends far beyond the island to people who have been touched by the beauty of Cortes. In January, a petition with over 6,200 signatures was hand delivered to the offices of IT and its parent company, Brookfield Asset Management, in seven cities around the world. If the name Brookfield sounds familiar, it’s because this is the same company that owns Zucotti Park in New York, from which Occupy Wall Street was evicted. Occupy London delivered the petition to Brookfield’s UK office, an interesting example of how the Occupy movement continues to have an impact on movements for change.

Under Brookfield, a number of BC mills have been closed, and the rates of timber harvest and export of raw logs to China have sharply increased. Brookfield Infrastructure Partners, which holds IT, avoids certain Canadian taxes and civil liabilities by keeping its headquarters in the Bahamas. Brookfield’s directors are also involved in run-of-river energy projects in BC, tar sands development, and the building of a massive private prison in Surrey for the BC government.

BC’s Auditor General John Doyle recently released a report showing that the government is badly mismanaging our forests, lacking reliable information on the state of BC forests and failing to replant trees at an adequate rate. The truth is that even if the Cortes campaign is successful, issues like this will continue to appear. We need stronger private managed forest land regulations in BC, and structural change that puts future generations and our critically important ecosystems first.

How can you support the Cortes Island community?

·      Sign the WildStands petition, send a letter, and pledge your support to the Cortes Forest Trust Project at wildstands.org

·      Sign the Ancient Forest Alliance’s petition to protect old-growth forests and ban raw log exports at: http://www.AncientForestPetition.com

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